Saturday, March 18, 2006

A waiter's nightmare...


I was loosing my voice yesterday, but toughed it out through an 8 hour shift because it's a Friday in Lent, and we were already a person short on the floor. Wait times were insane. Kitchen worked great, the slow down was everyone drinking for St. Patrick's Day so tables were not moving. By the end of the night, my voice that was weakening, was gone. I had to go turn the music down so the guests could hear me take their order. When I woke up this morning, my voice box was on fire, and I can barely utter a peep. Not good. Thankfully I have 2 days off. We'll see if it comes back by Monday. I'll take it easy, avoid talking and signing the next couple of days and see how it goes.

7 comments:

mist said...

hang in there babe. I have found that hot pineapple juice with honey is good for getting the voice back.

Anonymous said...

Maybe you should turn the music down all the time, I really dount if people go to RL to listen to bad jazz, but that would probably be against some corporate policy.

Lobster Boy said...

We don't have jazz in our restaurant, we have contemporary and oldies mixed. Contemporary of course meaning nothing newer than a year old still. Generally the music is kept at a level loud enough to mask the general background noise. We have enough old people who would complain if it were any louder than that. But during busy times, the volume goes up to compensate. At the end of the night, it's not uncommon for the music to not have been turned back down, but in this case I turned it down below our standard level. Thankfully there are different controls for various parts of the store, so I could just turn down my area.

Lobster Boy

Anonymous said...

Contemporary and oldies? Geez, that sounds awful. I'm glad I don't eat at RL or other chains.

Lobster Boy said...

Yeah, it's not the best music, then having to listen to it for 25-40 hours a week, over, and over, and over and over and over....


Lobster Boy

Anonymous said...

Think about it. Nobody wants to hear the music, but management got the idea that it's necessary, so people have to talk louder to be heard over the radio, and then you have to turn up the receiver so people can hear it over their artificially loud talking. No wonder you lost your voice. Face it, corporate dining sucks.

Lobster Boy said...

Corporate dining, in general, does suck. But the music is a masking agent, it's not there for the music's sake. The restaurant without the music would be a roar of competing conversations, and no privacy. If you study these types of things (I have) you understand that while the music adds noise, it also adds an element of privacy. You can hear that other people are talking, but it's difficult to make out their conversations. This is important when you have tables piled on top of each other to maximize the floor space to fit the most possible guests.

Lobster Boy